What’s an advocate of clear GMO labeling to do now that President Barack Obama has signed into law the food industry-supported measure dubbed the DARK Act?

One option, according to the Organic Consumers Association (OCA), is to join roughly half a million people who’ve said they will boycott brands that won’t label their products—in a clear way for everyone to see—that have been produced with genetic engineering.

When Obama on Friday signed the measure “paid for and written by corporations who clearly have something to hide,” said Ronnie Cummins, international director of OCA, the president “succumbed to industry pressure to betray the 90 percent of Americans who want GMOs labeled.”

Congress passed the measure, which supercedes Vermont’s historic labeling law, last month, and now, as the Associated Press reports, the “Agriculture Department has two years to write the rules.”

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Here’s where the controversy lies: While called a GMO labeling bill—and though the White House says it “will provide new opportunities for consumers to have access to information about their food”—the organization Just Label It says it “falls short of what consumers rightly expect—a simple at-a-glance GMO disclosure on the package,” and “contains loopholes that could limit the number of products that must carry a GMO disclosure.”

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